The Glass House Blog

Painting From Glass House Collection Included in New Exhibition at L&M Arts + Frank Stella Film


Glass House Film: Frank Stella: Return to the Glass House

.
Painting From Glass House Collection Included in Exhibition at L&M Arts: 
The Frank Stella painting, Averroes (1960), from the Philip Johnson Glass House permanent collection is currently on view as part of the exhibition Frank Stella: Black, Aluminum, and Copper Paintings at L&M Arts gallery in New York. See the exhibition now through June 2, 2012, at L&M Arts gallery, 45 East 78 Street New York, NY 10075, 10:00 am – 5:30 pm Tuesday – Saturday, or by appointment. www.lmgallery.com

For more information on the exhibition, the Stella collection at the Philip Johnson Glass House and the recent Glass House visit to Stella’s studio view the Philip Johnson Glass House Blog post: Frank Stella Painting from the Glass House Collection Included in New Exhibition at L&M Arts

Filed under: From the Collection, Glass House Films, , , ,

Frank Stella Painting from the Glass House Collection Included in New Exhibition at L&M Arts

Philip Johnson Glass House, Painting Gallery, © Harf Zimmermann. Painting on View at right is Averroes (1960) by Frank Stella.
Paintings in the Philip Johnson Glass House Painting Gallery, from left to rightPhilip Johnson (1972) by Andy Warhol, Brzozdowce I (1973) by Frank Stella, Konskie III (1971) by Frank Stella, Tetuan II (1964) by Frank Stella, and Averroes (1960) by Frank Stella.
Photo © Harf Zimmermann.

The Frank Stella painting, Averroes (1960), from the Philip Johnson Glass House permanent collection is currently on view as part of the exhibition Frank Stella: Black, Aluminum, and Copper Paintings at L&M Arts gallery in New York.

Art critic Roberta Smith of the New York Times recently described the exhibition in her review Laying the Tracks Others Followed, Frank Stella’s Early Work at L&M Arts:

It features 13 of the adamant, quietly pulsing, exceedingly frontal paintings that Mr. Stella made in New York in the three and a half years after he arrived here in the summer of 1958, fresh out of Princeton.

This amounts to more early Stellas than have been exhibited in New York since the survey of his work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1970. They provide a heady sense of the first few fastest-moving years of his development, when he helped bring the Abstract Expressionist chapter of New York School painting to a close and lay the foundation for Minimalism.

Smith goes on to describe Stella’s Aluminum series, including Averroes:

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: From the Collection, , , , , , , ,

The Conservation of Bruce Nauman’s Sculpture Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body at Ten Inch Intervals (1966)

Bruce Nauman's Sculpture Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body at Ten Inch Intervals (1966)

On view in the Sculpture Gallery, Bruce Nauman’s Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body at Ten Inch Intervals is integral to the permanent collection of the Glass House. Nauman, recognized as one of America’s most innovative and provocative artists emerged in the mid-1960s as a leading figure in Performance and Body Art and has since created an open-ended body of work that includes sculptures, photographs, films, videos, holograms, interactive environments, performances, and neon wall reliefs.

Learn more about the conservation of Nauman’s Neon Templates at the Glass House.

Filed under: From the Collection, Preservation in Action, , , , , , , , , , ,

Support The Glass House

Dear Friends,

Architecture, Art and Audience are our three motivations. The Philip Johnson Glass House is simply one of the most significant modernist sites in America, the private home that inspired a revolution in mid-20th century living that extends to the present day. The site’s remaining art collection provides a fascinating insight to the curatorial talents of Johnson’s partner, David Whitney. Between them, Johnson and Whitney significantly shaped the exhibitions and collections of the Museum of Modern Art’s formative decades. In opening the site for tours and in creating deeper and richer web content, our goal is to educate and inspire you, our local, national, and international audience.To accomplish our goals of preserving, restoring and performing original research, we count on the generosity of our supporters. We count on you!This year, more than ever, we need your help to balance our budget: Our endowment covers only 40% of our operations, preservation and programs.

Filed under: Educational Partnership, From the Collection, Glass House Conversations, Glass House Design Store, Glass House Films, Message from the Director, Preservation in Action, Tours + Programs, , , ,

Living in the Glass House

Support The Glass House

Dear Friends,

It has been an incredibly fast-paced year for the Philip Johnson Glass House. We celebrated our Fifth Season by developing new ways of welcoming the public to our site in person, online, through educational programs and events, and at art and design fairs around the world.

We’ve collaborated with significant architects (Charles Renfro, Tod Williams + Billie Tsien, Gregg Pasquarelli), artists (James Welling, Todd Eberle, David Salle) and writers (Paul Goldberger, Karen Stein, Philip Nobel), great chefs (Michele Richard, Brian Lewis, Bill Taibe, Lee Chizmar, Derek Wagner), as well as talented local high school students and their inspired teachers.

This year, more than ever, we need your support to help balance our budget. Our endowment covers only 40% of our operations, preservation and programs but we count on the generosity of our supporters to complete the picture.

Here’s why we hope you will  Donate Now!


New Tours

Focus: Concentrate on art, landscape and /or architecture -you decide!

Plein Air Afternoons: Unguided access for creative inspiration.
Pure Glass: Short, sweet and the lucid heart of the property

Cultural Experiences in Person
and Online

Private made Public: Salons hosted by cultural leaders are now available to all, either through an evening on site or connecting through an online film of each program.

Preservation and Conservation: The first site-specific work of Donald Judd, Untitled, 1971 was cleaned and conserved this season. Explore documentation of the it’s history, from archival images of the initial installation, to video of the conservation team at work and an online dialogue led by Flavin Judd.

Important Research: A seminal biography of David Whitney, Philip Johnson’s private but influential partner, is essential reading for understanding of the legacy of Johnson, Whitney and the Glass House.

Community

Generations Together: This fall marks our fourth year working with the New Canaan High School students and their teachers. This year’s projects included landscape photography and oral history films featuring local notable architects John Black Lee, John Johansen, and Fred Noyes speaking about his father, Eliot Noyes. These projects bring generations together to explore the essential history of New Canaan and Modernism. All of the student-produced oral histories and many of their photographs 
can now be enjoyed on our website.

47 Acres and 14 Structures

Storms: Besides the investments we choose to make, because we believe in them and their importance, there are the investments we need to make. Hurricane Irene, seasonal flooding and heavy unexpected snowstorms hammered the Glass House just as it did our neighbors. Repairs and canceled tours due to power outages and clean-ups resulted in significant lost revenues that severely affected our bottom line.

To maintain our role as an important community asset and site of international significance, we need your support. Please help us balance the Glass House budget with a generous year-end donation.

We welcome your support at every level.  Donate Now!

We hope to see you at the Glass House soon and often, on a tour through November, or early next season.

Sincerely,

Rena Zurofsky
Interim Executive Director
.
.

The Library of Philip JohnsonAs an additional thank you for your donation of $1,000 or more, we will send you a copy of the just published, limited edition Library of Philip Johnson. Written by Birch Cooper and Jordan Hruska, this beautifully illustrated book examines 100 titles from the architect’s Library/Study located at the Glass House site and features an introduction by Architect Robert A. M. Stern, textual analyses and 350 photographs.

Donors of $5,000 or more will also receive invitations to an exclusive event at The Glass House during the 2012 season.

Facebook Single IconTwitter Single Icon  AIA

Filed under: Conversations in Context, Dine with Design, Educational Partnership, From the Collection, Glass House Conversations, Glass House Design Store, Glass House Films, Message from the Director, Preservation in Action, Tours + Programs, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Glass House Collection on loan: Bruce Nauman at @ICAinBOSTON & John Chamberlain at the @Guggenheim


Photograph courtesy of Dean Kaufman, 2007
ARTIST: Nauman, Bruce (American, b.1941)
TITLE: Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body Taken at Ten Inch Intervals, 1966
OBJECT INFORMATION: Neon tubes, electrical wire, transformer, glass rods, and wall connectors
70″ x 9″ x 6″

The Glass House will loan its exhibition copy of Bruce Nauman’s early neon sculpture, Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body Taken at Ten Inch Intervals (1966) to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston for the museum’s 75th anniversary exhibition Dance/Draw. The landmark exhibition exploring the dynamic exchange taking place between visual art and dance today and runs from October 7 through January 16, 2012.

EXHIBITION INFORMATION:

DANCE/DRAW
October 7, 2011-January 16, 2012
Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston
http://www.icaboston.org/
100 Northern Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts


Photograph by David Heald
ARTIST: John Chamberlain
TITLE: H.A.W.K., (1959)
OBJECT INFORMATION: Welded and painted steel
H 51-1/2″ x W 53″ x D 41″

The Glass House will also loan John Chamberlain’s H.A.W.K., (1959) to The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum for a Chamberlain exhibition scheduled to open in February 2012.

http://www.guggenheim.org/

Filed under: From the Collection, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New Essay – David Whitney: A Curated Life and an Extraordinary Eye

David Whitney

David Whitney (1939-2005) was an accomplished curator and editor, an avid art collector and gardener, a loyal friend to many artists, an art adviser, and an advocate of contemporary art. In contrast to his outspoken partner of forty-five years, Philip Johnson, Whitney was an art world insider who preferred to maintain his privacy.

Read the new essay about Whitney’s life and legacy.

Filed under: From the Collection, ,

Frank Stella at the Glass House

Watch Frank Stella discuss his works in painting and sculpture that form the core of the Glass House art collection and inspired Philip Johnson’s last constructed building on the site.  Join an Art Focus tour this season to learn more about Johnson’s world-class collection of contemporary art.

Filed under: From the Collection, , , ,

On View at Mary Boone Gallery, New York

Courtesy of David Salle/Licensed by VAGA, New York

David Salle: Some Pictures from the 80s

Mary Boone Gallery

541 West 24th Street

New York, New York

May 8 – June 26, 2010


 

On loan from the Philip Johnson Glass House Collection:

David Salle
Miner, 1985
96” by 162”
acrylic, oil, wood and metal tables, canvas, fabric

 

Miner (1985) is on view in David Salle: Some Pictures from the 80s at Mary Boone Gallery’s Chelsea location, 541 West 24th Street, from May 8th to June 26th, 2010.

Born in Oklahoma in 1952, Salle gained recognition in the early 1980s.  Often grouped with his peers, who include Jean-Michel Basquiat, Eric Fischl, and Julian Schnabel, these artists were categorized as “Neo-Expressionists.”  In contrast to the preceding decade, during which minimalism, conceptual art, and arte povera emerged, Neo-Expressionism embraced representation, and the bold, undaunted hand of the artist is clearly evident in each individual artist’s work.  Within this grouping, Salle’s work is distinguished by its seemingly unrelated, layered images that are superimposed on the canvas and often paired with a second canvas.  Only by looking at each layer carefully does the viewer begin to connect images, creating associations and meaning drawn from their own individual experiences and opinions.

Miner, a large scale work, is composed of four parts: two painted canvases and two broken café tables.  On the right, a seated male-figure leans forward.  Depicted only in black and white, his eyes are blank and distant.  Floating above each of his forearms, in the bicep area, is a purple line drawing of a ring inset with a large jewel, presumable the end product of his labor.  Attached perpendicular to the canvas, on each side of his head is a white café table.  The wooden table tops are smashed from below, such that sharp, broken surfaces protrude toward the viewer.

To the contrary on the left, colorful line drawings are painted and layered onto a striped fabric.  The drawings are difficult to read, although each layer is differentiated by color.  The upper body and profile of patrician woman in patterned garb and the column capitals of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Johnson Wax Building in Racine, Wisconsin slowly emerge from the surface:  The female figure has a furrowed brow.   The office does not depict the floor or any activity that occurs within its walls.

For me, this painting comments on both consumer culture and corporate culture, two sides of the same coin.  Simmering hostility directly underneath obvious pathos overwhelm the right side of the artwork, while the left side is troubled, impersonal, and cold; such that the striped fabric begins to evoke societal striations.

Acquired in 1985 by Philip Johnson, Miner was first at Mary Boone Gallery, New York, then loaned to the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh for its triennial, Carnegie International 1985.  This work was prominently displayed in David Salle, an exhibition organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia in 1986, travelling from 1987-88 to the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and The Menil Collection, Houston.

David Salle lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Irene Shum Allen, May 8, 2010

EXHIBITION WEBSITE:
http://www.maryboonegallery.com/exhibitions/2009-2010/David-Salle/

GALLERY WEBSITE:
http://www.maryboonegallery.com/

SUGGESTED READING:

David Salle: Some Pictures from the 80s
essay by Klaus Kertess
published by Mary Boone Gallery, 2010

David Salle: Distance from Nowhere
edited by Veit Forner and Frank-Thorsten Moll
published by Kehrer Verlag, 2010

David Salle: 1979-94
edited by David Whitney
published by Rizzoli, 1994

David Salle
by Janet Kardon and essay by Lisa Phillips
published by Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 1986

Filed under: From the Collection

From the Curator

Welcome to the Glass House blog! I am thrilled to introduce the many projects that I have been involved with over the past three and half years. I will also keep you posted on present and future projects.

2010 is an exciting year, and the public tour season opens with several collections and conservation projects already underway.  In the coming weeks, I will go in depth about these projects. My posts will also feature artworks from the collection and artists represented in the Collection.

Stayed tuned and get involved!

Irene Shum Allen

Conservation in Action
Luca Bonetti Conservation Studio, New York
Poussin Conservation Project, Fall 2007-Winter2008

Filed under: From the Collection

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,707 other followers

%d bloggers like this: